Social mobility and health inequalities in Glasgow

This research will explore whether selective migration to Scotland's 'New Towns' contributes to Glasgow's poor health and excess mortality.

Our research

This research combines several pieces of work aiming to examine the social mobility and health of those who stayed with those who moved both in and out of Glasgow. We will look at who moved from Glasgow to regions with New Towns. We will compare the adult health and social class of those who moved with the health of those staying in Glasgow and also those who moved into Glasgow; and how the places and groups a child grows up in affects their wellbeing later in life. We will explore the following questions:

  • What is the pattern of social mobility for this cohort? 
  • How does morbidity and premature mortality vary by social mobility trajectory? 
  • How does morbidity and premature mortality vary by migration status trajectory? 
  • How does morbidity and premature mortality vary by NHS region in child and adulthood? 
  • How is the health of Glasgow in comparison to other areas different when migrants are put back to their childhood region? 
  • How does social mobility in the migrant groups compare to a group (matched on sex, cognitive ability and childhood social class) who remained in Glasgow? 
  • How does morbidity and mortality in the migrant groups (both in and out of Glasgow) compare to a group (matched on sex, cognitive ability and childhood social class) who remained in Glasgow? 

Data this research aims to link and analyse

  • Scottish Mental Survey 1947 (cognitive ability)
  • National Health Service Central Register (NHSCR) data (health board area, death)
  • The 2001 census (occupation, education, self-reported general health)
  • 1939 register (early life social class)

Research team

Project lead: Professor Chris Dibben and  Dr Lynne Forrest, University of Edinburgh, Scottish Centre for Administrative Data Research.

Publications and outputs

When publications or outputs are available, they will be shared here. For more information about this project, please contact us.